Japan protests call for emperor to apologize to Korean 'comfort women'

Japan said on Tuesday it had lodged a complaint with South Korea and after a Korean lawmaker said the Japanese emperor should apologize to “comfort women” forced to serve in Japanese military brothels in World War Two. Relations between Japan and South Korea, both U.S. allies, have amid an intensifying row over their wartime history. South Korea’s National Assembly Speaker Moon Hee-sang said in an interview with Bloomberg last week Japanese Emperor Akihito, “as the son of the main culprit of war crimes”, should apologize to the women before he steps down at the end of April.

See more here:
Japan protests call for emperor to apologize to Korean 'comfort women'

Renault: Ghosn remains director of Renault, Bollore chairman of Renault-Nissan

Carlos Ghosn remains a director of Renault SA even though he has resigned as chairman and chief executive and Thierry Bollore is now chairman of the Renault-Nissan BV holding company, Renault said on Tuesday. “In addition to the Board of Directors’ communication of January 24, 2019, Renault wishes to specify that Mr. Ghosn resigned from his terms of office as Chairman of the Board ofDirectors and Chief Executive Officer, but remains, as of the date hereof, Director of Renault SA,” the company said.

See more here:
Renault: Ghosn remains director of Renault, Bollore chairman of Renault-Nissan

U.S. court blocks Anthem-Cigna deal, dealing blow to consolidation

The U.S. Justice Department sued in July to stop Anthem's purchase of Cigna, a deal that would have created the largest U.S. health insurer by membership, and Aetna Inc's planned $33 billion acquisition of Humana . On Wednesday, Judge Amy Berman Jackson of U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia issued the ruling against Anthem's deal, saying that the merger would have worsened an already highly concentrated market and was likely to raise prices.

Read the original post:
U.S. court blocks Anthem-Cigna deal, dealing blow to consolidation

Asian stocks tread water on U.S. cues, Europe concerns

Asian stocks looked set to consolidate around four-month highs on Thursday as a cautious Wall Street close and growing political risks in Europe force investors to the sidelines. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was broadly flat, with early Asian markets such as Australia hemmed in tight ranges. Political concerns, including a strong showing by far-right candidate Marine Le Pen in France's presidential race, have pushed up premiums demanded by investors to buy French debt over comparable bonds and pushed the yen and U.S. Treasuries higher.

See the rest here:
Asian stocks tread water on U.S. cues, Europe concerns

Savaged dollar steadies ahead of Fed, stocks rise

World stocks made their first gain in five days on Wednesday as the dollar steadied from turbulence after the Trump administration accused Germany, Japan and China of devaluing their currencies to gain a trade advantage. The U.S. currency suffered its worst January in three decades after President Donald Trump complained that every “other country lives on devaluation”. Bargain hunters nudged the dollar up 0.15 percent in Asian and European trading, reassuring themselves that the Federal Reserve should signal later that it still plans to raise U.S. interest rates a number of times this year.

Here is the original post:
Savaged dollar steadies ahead of Fed, stocks rise

Dollar slips after Trump’s protectionist address, Asia shares resilient

The dollar slipped broadly on Monday after U.S. President Donald Trump struck a protectionist tone in his inauguration speech, offsetting optimism that he will follow through on promises of tax cuts and other stimulus. Japan's Nikkei dropped 1.1 percent while shares in Australia dropped 0.7 percent after the Trump administration, on its first day in office, declared its intention to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a 12-nation trade pact that Japan and Australia also have signed up for. Other Asian shares were resilient, however, in part due to a relief that there was no negative surprises, with Trump refraining from labelling China as a currency manipulator for now, an accusation he made while campaigning.

View original post here: 
Dollar slips after Trump’s protectionist address, Asia shares resilient

U.S. property foreclosures at 10-year low in 2016

Foreclosures hit a 10-year low and property owners in all but 15 states experienced fewer of the early stages of foreclosure, usually begun after owners have missed four mortgage payments, according to the report by ATTOM Data Solutions, formerly called RealtyTrac. Final repossessions of properties also dropped overall, but did increase in 21 states and the District of Columbia, including Massachusetts, Alabama, New York, Virginia and New Jersey. Daren Blomquist, spokesman for the Irvine, California, data company, said just over half of the foreclosures that did take place were related to the housing crisis, which began in 2008 amid turmoil in the financial markets and the bursting of a years-long bubble in U.S. real estate prices.

See the original post here: 
U.S. property foreclosures at 10-year low in 2016

China’s anti-Teslas: cheap models drive electric car boom

More electric cars are sold in China than in the rest of the world combined, but are mainly locally-branded models that are cheaper and have a shorter range than those offered by foreign automakers such as Tesla and Nissan . The Chinese-branded electric vehicle (EV) market is propped up by huge government subsidies as part of Beijing's policy to build global leadership in cleaner energy driving. China has spent billions of dollars on subsidies to help companies including Warren Buffett-backed BYD and BAIC Motor achieve large-scale production of plug-in vehicles, which are gaining traction among urban drivers as well as taxi fleets and government agencies.

See more here:
China’s anti-Teslas: cheap models drive electric car boom

Dollar loses altitude, Asia shares touch 11-week high

By Wayne Cole SYDNEY (Reuters) – The U.S. dollar nursed widespread losses on Thursday after President-elect Donald Trump's long-awaited news briefing provided scant clarity on future fiscal policies, disappointing bulls wagering on major stimulus. The euro had rallied to $1.0602 from a trough of $1.0454, while the dollar lapsed to 114.76 yen from a top of 116.87.

Read the original post: 
Dollar loses altitude, Asia shares touch 11-week high

Asian stocks bounce on U.S. cues though dlr gains may clip wings

By Saikat Chatterjee HONG KONG (Reuters) – Asian stocks edged higher on Monday, helped by a strong Wall Street, and the dollar stood tall against rivals after the latest U.S. payrolls data indicated strong underlying wage growth, strengthening the case for more rate increases in 2017. Underlying sentiment was increasingly cautious as investors grew wary of the corrosive effects of a stronger greenback on some Asian markets such as Hong Kong and before a news conference by President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday where his views on global trade and China will be carefully scrutinized for future policy implications. Australia's S&P/ASX200 rose 1 percent while Hong Kong shares rose 0.4 percent.

Read the original: 
Asian stocks bounce on U.S. cues though dlr gains may clip wings