Renault: Ghosn remains director of Renault, Bollore chairman of Renault-Nissan

Carlos Ghosn remains a director of Renault SA even though he has resigned as chairman and chief executive and Thierry Bollore is now chairman of the Renault-Nissan BV holding company, Renault said on Tuesday. “In addition to the Board of Directors’ communication of January 24, 2019, Renault wishes to specify that Mr. Ghosn resigned from his terms of office as Chairman of the Board ofDirectors and Chief Executive Officer, but remains, as of the date hereof, Director of Renault SA,” the company said.

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Renault: Ghosn remains director of Renault, Bollore chairman of Renault-Nissan

Stocks Rise, Bonds Slip on Shutdown, Trade Hopes: Markets Wrap

U.S. futures added to gains as President Donald Trump spoke at a rally without casting any immediate shadow over a deal in principle among legislators to fund the government. Japanese 10-year bond yields remained in negative territory even after the Bank of Japan on Tuesday cut purchases of some longer-dated bonds for the first time since July in a regular operation. The BOJ has sought to taper its purchases as it focuses on yield targets rather than quantitative easing.

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Stocks Rise, Bonds Slip on Shutdown, Trade Hopes: Markets Wrap

Renault-Nissan’s French peace deal leaves investors underwhelmed

The Renault-Nissan alliance drew a line under an eight-month power struggle with the French government on Friday, with a compromise deal balancing increased state influence at Renault with weakened control over its Japanese affiliate. The agreement, offering Nissan guarantees against future interference by parent Renault or its own biggest shareholder, the French state, came as a relief to Renault staff while disappointing some investors who had hoped for bigger changes to the 16-year-old carmaking alliance. Tension had been building since April, when Economy Minister Emmanuel Macron temporarily raised France's Renault stake to secure a permanent increase in its voting rights – and enough clout to veto strategic decisions or tie-ups that might one day endanger domestic jobs or other national interests.

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Renault-Nissan’s French peace deal leaves investors underwhelmed