Japan protests call for emperor to apologize to Korean 'comfort women'

Japan said on Tuesday it had lodged a complaint with South Korea and after a Korean lawmaker said the Japanese emperor should apologize to “comfort women” forced to serve in Japanese military brothels in World War Two. Relations between Japan and South Korea, both U.S. allies, have amid an intensifying row over their wartime history. South Korea’s National Assembly Speaker Moon Hee-sang said in an interview with Bloomberg last week Japanese Emperor Akihito, “as the son of the main culprit of war crimes”, should apologize to the women before he steps down at the end of April.

See more here:
Japan protests call for emperor to apologize to Korean 'comfort women'

Renault: Ghosn remains director of Renault, Bollore chairman of Renault-Nissan

Carlos Ghosn remains a director of Renault SA even though he has resigned as chairman and chief executive and Thierry Bollore is now chairman of the Renault-Nissan BV holding company, Renault said on Tuesday. “In addition to the Board of Directors’ communication of January 24, 2019, Renault wishes to specify that Mr. Ghosn resigned from his terms of office as Chairman of the Board ofDirectors and Chief Executive Officer, but remains, as of the date hereof, Director of Renault SA,” the company said.

See more here:
Renault: Ghosn remains director of Renault, Bollore chairman of Renault-Nissan

Stocks Rise, Bonds Slip on Shutdown, Trade Hopes: Markets Wrap

U.S. futures added to gains as President Donald Trump spoke at a rally without casting any immediate shadow over a deal in principle among legislators to fund the government. Japanese 10-year bond yields remained in negative territory even after the Bank of Japan on Tuesday cut purchases of some longer-dated bonds for the first time since July in a regular operation. The BOJ has sought to taper its purchases as it focuses on yield targets rather than quantitative easing.

View original post here: 
Stocks Rise, Bonds Slip on Shutdown, Trade Hopes: Markets Wrap

South Korea prosecutor seeks arrest of Samsung chief for bribery

By Ju-min Park and Se Young Lee SEOUL (Reuters) – South Korea's special prosecutor on Monday sought a warrant to arrest the head of Samsung Group [SAGR.UL], the country's largest conglomerate, accusing him of paying multi-million dollar bribes to a friend of President Park Geun-hye. Investigators had grilled Samsung Group chief Jay Y. Lee for 22 straight hours last week as a suspect in a corruption scandal, which last month led to parliament impeaching Park. The special prosecutor's office accused Lee of paying bribes total 43 billion won ($36.42 million) to organizations linked to Choi Soon-sil, a friend of the president who is at the center of the scandal, in order to secure the 2015 merger of two affiliates and cement his control of the family business.

Read the original here: 
South Korea prosecutor seeks arrest of Samsung chief for bribery

South Korea bans sales of some Nissan, BMW and Porsche models

South Korea has banned the sale of 10 models of Nissan, BMW and Porsche vehicles after the carmakers were found to have fabricated certification documents, in the latest fallout from the Volkswagen emissions scandal. The government announced in August that it would ban all 10 models after conducting an investigation into whether foreign carmakers besides Volkswagen AG falsified documents on emissions and noise-level tests. Nine of the models have been banned since last month and Nissan's Qashqai diesel sport utility vehicle has been banned since June, the environment ministry said on Monday.

More here: 
South Korea bans sales of some Nissan, BMW and Porsche models

Samsung Elec to consider split: Seoul Economic Daily

South Korea's Samsung Electronics Co Ltd will consider splitting itself into two as proposed by activist hedge fund Elliott Management, Seoul Economic Daily reported on Monday citing an unnamed source. Samsung's board of directors would hold a meeting on Tuesday and formally respond to Elliott's proposals, the paper said. The Korea Exchange separately asked Samsung to comment by 6 p.m. (4.00 a.m. ET/0900 GMT) on whether it planned a spinoff.

Originally posted here: 
Samsung Elec to consider split: Seoul Economic Daily

U.S. shoppers spend less over holiday weekend amid discounting

By Nandita Bose CHICAGO (Reuters) – Early holiday promotions and a belief that deals will always be available took a toll on consumer spending over the Thanksgiving weekend as shoppers spent an average of 3.5 percent less than a year ago, the National Retail Federation said on Sunday. The NRF said its survey of 4,330 consumers, conducted on Friday and Saturday by research firm Prosper Insights & Analytics, showed that shoppers spent $289.19 over the four-day weekend through Sunday compared to $299.60 over the same period a year earlier. The U.S. holiday shopping season is expanding, and Black Friday is no longer the kickoff for the period it once was, with more retailers starting holiday promotions as early as October and running them until Christmas Eve.

See the original post: 
U.S. shoppers spend less over holiday weekend amid discounting

Asian stocks subdued, dollar hovers near nine-month high

Asian stocks were subdued early on Monday after Wall Street's sluggish performance at the end of last week, while the dollar hovered near nine-month highs as fresh comments from a Federal Reserve official boosted bets of a rate hike by year-end. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan inched down 0.1 percent. Japan's Nikkei stood little changed, while South Korea's Kospi gained 0.4 percent.

See the original post:
Asian stocks subdued, dollar hovers near nine-month high

Oil prices drop as Iraq says doesn’t want to join OPEC cut

By Henning Gloystein SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Oil prices fell early on Monday as Iraq said it wanted to be exempt from any deal by producer cartel OPEC to cut production to prop up the market, and as U.S. drillers stepped up work. International Brent crude oil futures were trading at $51.61 per barrel at 0051 GMT, down 17 cents from their last close. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were down 20 cents at $50.56 a barrel.

More:
Oil prices drop as Iraq says doesn’t want to join OPEC cut

U.S. options market not very ‘Trumped up’ ahead of vote

Prospects that the presidential election will inject a hefty dose of volatility into U.S. stock markets are fading fast as Republican Donald Trump's victory odds lengthen. A reading of positioning data on options tied to the benchmark S&P 500 index shows little pickup in demand for contracts that would offer investors downside insurance in the event that stock prices take a major hit right after the Nov. 8 election. “There had been a modest premium bump for November options a few weeks ago, but that seems to have faded steadily with Trump's slide in polls,” Purves said.

Originally posted here:
U.S. options market not very ‘Trumped up’ ahead of vote