China Bond Rally Still Has Room to Run, Ex-HKMA Manager Says

The People’s Bank of China may shift the interest-rate corridor down by 10 basis points in the second quarter if economic data continue to show softness, said Ng, who left the HKMA in 2015 and established investment firm Eastfort Asset Management Pte Ltd. “2019 should still be a mild bull market for China bonds, at least for the first half of the year given a dovish Fed, slowing onshore growth and more aggressive PBOC stance,� said Ng, who favors the nation’s five-year notes. Yields on China’s benchmark five- and 10-year notes have tumbled by almost 100 basis points over the past year as the U.S.-China trade war dent exports and factory output, spurring investors to seek havens.

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China Bond Rally Still Has Room to Run, Ex-HKMA Manager Says

Visa’s profit, revenue tops estimates on payment volume growth

(Reuters) – Visa Inc , the world's largest payments network operator, reported better-than-expected quarterly profit and revenue as more people made payments using its network. The company, whose shares were up 3.4 percent in extended trading on Thursday, also affirmed its full-year profit and revenue forecasts. Visa, like MasterCard Inc and its other peers, has been trying to capture the Chinese market, which is dominated by state-run China UnionPay Co Ltd. Visa remains committed to China in the long-term and plans to formally submit a license application in the country, Alfred Kelly said in his first earnings call since taking over as chief executive from Charles Scharf on Dec. 1.

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Visa’s profit, revenue tops estimates on payment volume growth

Dollar slips after Trump’s protectionist address, Asia shares resilient

The dollar slipped broadly on Monday after U.S. President Donald Trump struck a protectionist tone in his inauguration speech, offsetting optimism that he will follow through on promises of tax cuts and other stimulus. Japan's Nikkei dropped 1.1 percent while shares in Australia dropped 0.7 percent after the Trump administration, on its first day in office, declared its intention to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a 12-nation trade pact that Japan and Australia also have signed up for. Other Asian shares were resilient, however, in part due to a relief that there was no negative surprises, with Trump refraining from labelling China as a currency manipulator for now, an accusation he made while campaigning.

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Dollar slips after Trump’s protectionist address, Asia shares resilient

Asian stocks slip, dollar flat as caution reigns before Trump inauguration

Caution was the name of the game in financial markets on Friday ahead of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration later in the day, with Asian stocks and the dollar pulling back and U.S. Treasury yields hovering near their highest close this year. Investors were also awaiting fourth-quarter and full-year GDP data from China at 0200 GMT, for clues on how much momentum the world's second-largest economy is carrying into 2017. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan slipped 0.1 percent, and looked set to end the week flat.

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Asian stocks slip, dollar flat as caution reigns before Trump inauguration

U.S. lobby says China protectionism fuelling foreign business pessimism

More than 80 percent of members of a U.S. business lobby in China say foreign companies are less welcome than in the past, a survey released on Wednesday showed, with most saying they have little confidence in China's vows to open its markets. The American Chamber of Commerce in China's annual survey reinforces growing pessimism in the foreign business community, as it grapples with a slowing Chinese economy and complains of increasing protectionism. The chamber's report comes a day after China's President Xi Jinping gave a speech at the World Economic Forum championing open markets, and Beijing unveiled proposals to reduce restrictions on foreign investment in China.

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U.S. lobby says China protectionism fuelling foreign business pessimism

China vehicle sales to grow 5 percent in 2017 as tax cut reduced

By Jake Spring and Fang Cheng BEIJING(Reuters) – China's vehicle sales jumped 13.7 percent in 2016, the fastest pace in three years, thanks to a tax cut on small-engine cars but growth is expected to slow this year as the incentive is reduced. China's auto market, the world's largest, grew to 28 million vehicles in 2016 and will likely climb 5 percent in 2017 to 29.4 million vehicles, the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers said on Thursday. The sales tax on cars with engines of 1.6 liters or below was cut to 5 percent from 10 percent in late 2015, giving the auto industry a much-needed shot in the arm as the economy slowed.

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China vehicle sales to grow 5 percent in 2017 as tax cut reduced

Automakers tout new diesels despite Volkswagen’s troubles

Automakers unveiled several new diesel models at the Detroit auto show this week, hoping to dispel the doubts created by Volkswagen's diesel emissions scandal and revive interest in a technology that offers benefits under fuel economy regulations. Ford Motor Co said it would offer a diesel version of its best-selling F-150 pickup truck for the first time in 40 years, while General Motors Co said Sunday it will offer a diesel version of its compact GMC Terrain SUV. Last year, GM announced it will start selling diesel versions of it Chevrolet Equinox and Chevrolet Cruze car, while in November Mazda Motor Co said it would start selling a diesel version of its 2017 CX-5 SUV in the United States later this year.

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Automakers tout new diesels despite Volkswagen’s troubles

U.S. companies have new business risk – being labeled ‘anti-American’ by Trump

NEW YORK/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Some U.S. companies are reviewing potential mergers while others are rethinking job cuts or looking at their manufacturing operations in China for fear of being cast as “anti-American” by President-elect Donald Trump, according to Wall Street bankers, company executives and crisis management consultants. Having seen some of America's largest companies, including General Motors Co , Lockheed Martin Corp and United Technologies Corp , bluntly and publicly rebuked by Trump on Twitter, many others are worried they may be his next target – especially if they have significant overseas manufacturing, have had U.S. job cuts or price increases for consumers.

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U.S. companies have new business risk – being labeled ‘anti-American’ by Trump

Dismal holiday sales at Macy’s and Kohl’s cast gloom over sector

Macy's shares fell as much as 14 percent on Thursday, their biggest percentage drop in seven months. Macy's, known the world over for its flagship Herald Square store in Manhattan and its annual Thanksgiving Day parade, is considered a bellwether for department stores. Amazon said last week it had its “best ever” holiday season, shipping more than 1 billion items worldwide.

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Dismal holiday sales at Macy’s and Kohl’s cast gloom over sector