Japan protests call for emperor to apologize to Korean 'comfort women'

Japan said on Tuesday it had lodged a complaint with South Korea and after a Korean lawmaker said the Japanese emperor should apologize to “comfort women” forced to serve in Japanese military brothels in World War Two. Relations between Japan and South Korea, both U.S. allies, have amid an intensifying row over their wartime history. South Korea’s National Assembly Speaker Moon Hee-sang said in an interview with Bloomberg last week Japanese Emperor Akihito, “as the son of the main culprit of war crimes”, should apologize to the women before he steps down at the end of April.

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Japan protests call for emperor to apologize to Korean 'comfort women'

Renault: Ghosn remains director of Renault, Bollore chairman of Renault-Nissan

Carlos Ghosn remains a director of Renault SA even though he has resigned as chairman and chief executive and Thierry Bollore is now chairman of the Renault-Nissan BV holding company, Renault said on Tuesday. “In addition to the Board of Directors’ communication of January 24, 2019, Renault wishes to specify that Mr. Ghosn resigned from his terms of office as Chairman of the Board ofDirectors and Chief Executive Officer, but remains, as of the date hereof, Director of Renault SA,” the company said.

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Renault: Ghosn remains director of Renault, Bollore chairman of Renault-Nissan

Toshiba prepares to unveil nuclear hole, other perils threaten

By Makiko Yamazaki and Taro Fuse TOKYO (Reuters) – Toshiba Corp will on Tuesday detail a writedown of close to $6 billion after bruising cost overruns at its U.S. nuclear arm, turning investor attention to the Japanese group's efforts to fix that and other balance sheet headaches. Sources familiar with the matter say the final charge, to be detailed alongside quarterly earnings, will be as high as 700 billion yen ($6.2 billion), a sum which alone would wipe out the company's shareholder equity. Toshiba, which has seen its market value almost halve since the prospect of a writedown emerged in December, is also expected to outline the prospects for its nuclear arm and update investors on efforts to raise capital, including through the sale of a stake in its flagship memory chips business.

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Toshiba prepares to unveil nuclear hole, other perils threaten

Exclusive: Japan secures extra cost cuts on U.S. F-35 fighter jet package – sources

Tokyo has secured cost cuts on support equipment for its next batch of six U.S. F-35 stealth fighter aircraft of around $100 million, according to sources and Japanese budget papers, on top of savings being finalised for all buyers of the high-tech jets. The deal represents a rare case of Tokyo negotiating down the price of military hardware from its U.S. ally and underscores progress for the Lockheed Martin Corp-run F-35 program, which has faced criticisms over cost overruns and other problems. U.S. President Donald Trump, who lashed the program as “out of control” in December, said on Monday he had been able to shave some $600 million from the latest U.S. deal to buy about 90 F-35s from Lockheed.

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Exclusive: Japan secures extra cost cuts on U.S. F-35 fighter jet package – sources

How Russia sold its oil jewel: without saying who bought it

MOSCOW/LONDON/MILAN (Reuters) – More than a month after Russia announced one of its biggest privatizations since the 1990s, selling a 19.5 percent stake in its giant oil company Rosneft, it still isn't possible to determine from public records the full identities of those who bought it. The stake was sold for 10.2 billion euros to a Singapore investment vehicle that Rosneft said was a 50/50 joint venture between Qatar and the Swiss oil trading firm Glencore. Unveiling the deal at a televised meeting with Rosneft's boss Igor Sechin on Dec. 7, President Vladimir Putin called it a sign of international faith in Russia, despite U.S. and EU financial sanctions on Russian firms including Rosneft.

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How Russia sold its oil jewel: without saying who bought it

Toyota Motor to add 400 jobs at Indiana assembly plant

By Naomi Tajitsu and David Shepardson TOKYO/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Toyota Motor Corp on Tuesday said it would add 400 jobs to build more SUVs at one of its U.S. plants, highlighting its expansion plans just as U.S. President Donald Trump calls on manufacturers to build more cars in the country. The Japanese automaker said the jobs were part of a $600 million upgrade of its plant in Princeton, Indiana, and were included in its plans announced earlier this month to invest $10 billion in its U.S. operations over the next five years.

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Toyota Motor to add 400 jobs at Indiana assembly plant

Japan Inc believes Abe, Trump don’t want to see excessive yen weakness: Reuters poll

By Tetsushi Kajimoto TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese companies believe that neither U.S. President Donald Trump nor Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe want to see the yen weaken significantly, a Reuters poll showed, a development they worry could spark an unwelcome political backlash. The Reuters Corporate Survey, conducted Jan. 4-17, also found that Japanese firms want Abe to push Trump hard on trade issues, while nearly a third cited national security concerns as the most pressing issue Abe should bring up with the new president. The latest survey highlights caution over how U.S. policy will develop under Trump, who was sworn in as president on Friday, with his protectionist agenda casting a cloud over the outlook on global trade.

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Japan Inc believes Abe, Trump don’t want to see excessive yen weakness: Reuters poll

Trump: Toyota faces big tax if it builds Corolla cars for U.S. in Mexico

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump on Thursday targeted Toyota Motor Co , threatening to impose a hefty fee on the Japanese automaker it if builds its Corolla cars for the U.S. market at a plant in Mexico. “Toyota Motor said will build a new plant in Baja, Mexico, to build Corolla cars for U.S. NO WAY! Build plant in U.S. or pay big border tax,” Trump said in a post on Twitter. Toyota, which announced its plan to build the Mexican facility in April 2015, had no immediate comment

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Trump: Toyota faces big tax if it builds Corolla cars for U.S. in Mexico

Toshiba flags hit of ‘billions of dollars’ on U.S. nuclear acquisition

Toshiba Corp said it may have to book several billion dollars in charges related to a U.S. nuclear power acquisition, a shock warning that sent its stock tumbling 12 percent and rekindled concerns about its accounting acumen. Such a hit would be another slap in the face for a sprawling conglomerate hoping to recover from a $1.3 billion accounting scandal as well as a writedown of more than $2 billion for its nuclear business in the last financial year.”This will come as an additional shock to Toshiba's institutional investors that may further undermine confidence in company management as well as significantly weakening its international nuclear credentials,” said Tom O'Sullivan, founder of energy consultancy Mathyos Japan. O'Sullivan noted the acquisition in December 2015 coincided with the finalizing of a record fine by Japanese regulators for accounting irregularities at Toshiba, indicating that corporate governance controls were extremely weak.

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Toshiba flags hit of ‘billions of dollars’ on U.S. nuclear acquisition

Rolls-Royce denies UK media report over past Iran sales

British engineering company Rolls-Royce denied a report in The Guardian newspaper on Wednesday that it had in the past sold equipment to Iran by exploiting a series of loopholes in U.S. sanctions. “Rolls-Royce refutes any accusation that it has traded 'in secret' in Iran or that it circumvented U.S. sanctions,” said a Rolls-Royce spokesman in an emailed statement. “We conduct business in all countries, including Iran, in accordance with all relevant UK, EU or other national sanctions and export control regulations.

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Rolls-Royce denies UK media report over past Iran sales